Thoughts on the way to the recital

said: Mar 13, 2009
 48 posts

Why did she choose to do the longest and most difficult piece she knows (and the one she’s still working on polishing)? Why didn’t I (or the teacher) encourage her to do one of the earlier pieces instead?

Why is it that, when she’s worked really hard on this piece, and finally is able to play it more or less beautifully at home, we go in to the studio for the last lesson before the recital, and she stumbles on a dozen different places?

Why is this crazy piece included in this book, anyway? It ought to be halfway through the next book! What on earth was Suzuki thinking?

So much work goes into these recitals, by the teachers, staff, volunteers, parents, and kids … one kid after another goes up on stage, bows, plays for a few seconds or a minute, and then walks off stage … such a brief conclusion to so many days of practice.

Actually, there is a kind of mass-production feeling to this, with so many kids, many of them playing the same pieces!

Maybe that’s the one upside of her picking this darned piece … no other kid would be crazy enough to do this one.

She hasn’t shown a trace of “stage fright” at any of the previous recitals, but will this be the age when she suddenly develops it?

Why do I act more worried than she does before every recital, when I’m not the one going up on stage?

Diane said: Mar 14, 2009
Diane AllenViolin
244 posts

Thoughts on the way home from the recital???

Diane
http://www.myviolinvideos.com
Videos of student violin recitals and violin tutorials.

said: Mar 16, 2009
 48 posts

myviolinrecital

Thoughts on the way home from the recital???

WHEW!

Apparently my six-year-old daughter handles pressure better than I do.

:D

It went OK. One awkward stumble, and a couple of places where she hesitated slightly, but it could have been worse. More importantly her tone and articulation were pretty good, overall it sounded fine. She has a nice stage presence.

Also, it’s really neat to see how many new kids are starting, and how much the older kids have accomplished.

Let’s see, what other thoughts? I’m really grateful for her teacher and all the rest of the teachers and staff at the music center. I hope my daughter will still be doing this next year!

Also, I should probably learn to relax a bit more. :confused:

Diane said: Mar 19, 2009
Diane AllenViolin
244 posts

I wanted to hear “thoughts after the recital” before I answered “thoughts on the way to the recital”. You should also know that my point of view is that of a violin teacher with 23 years of experience!

Why did she choose to do the longest and most difficult piece she knows (and the one she’s still working on polishing)? Why didn’t I (or the teacher) encourage her to do one of the earlier pieces instead?Usually the teacher picks repertoire for the recital. I think a 6 year old could have some input in this decision but certainly not 100% input. Typically students should perform a piece that has been in the polishing stages for some time.[color=0000FF][/color]

Why is it that, when she’s worked really hard on this piece, and finally is able to play it more or less beautifully at home, we go in to the studio for the last lesson before the recital, and she stumbles on a dozen different places?This is a common occurence and one that I think every violinist works with. If we could all perform as well as we do at home anywhere, anytime, anyplace, any temperature, any hunger or energy level, etc. etc. Prior to a recital—my rule is 3 times minimum of a “performance prep.” situation. This may mean 3 rehearsals with the pianist. It could mean 1 rehearsal with the pianist, 1 concert for grandma over the telephone, 1 concert playing for the kids at school. It could be—perform once in every room of the house (including bathrooms and closets). Kids can go through a variety of experiences during this process ranging from performing “horribly” to “singing out strongly”. By the time the recital arrives—all these pre-performances help people get all their ya-ya’s out and the recital feels much more comfortable.

Why is this crazy piece included in this book, anyway? It ought to be halfway through the next book! What on earth was Suzuki thinking?Typical method books have an exercise followed by songs using the exercise and slowly and gradually increase in difficulty. Suzuki books have a chunk of songs in the same difficulty level, then there is a jump followed by a bunch of songs in the same difficulty level etc. Having a group of songs in the same level presents a completely different experience for the student than constantly getting incrementally harder. The first song in that level may be quite challenging to learn but the next couple of songs can be easier to learn, easier to get to polishing and as these songs sound so good and the student feels such a sense of accomplishment—bam—a leap of difficulty comes with the next song. This is when “review, review, and review some more” really helps bridge into a song like Etude. Also—I remember in the teacher training courses spending a lot of time on how to slowly ease into a “leap” song with many little “preview” steps. I also warn parents—you may feel some growing pains with this song. Just like women have amnesia with the pain of childbirth, we all forget the trials and tribulations of learning Twinkle!

So much work goes into these recitals, by the teachers, staff, volunteers, parents, and kids … one kid after another goes up on stage, bows, plays for a few seconds or a minute, and then walks off stage … such a brief conclusion to so many days of practice.Isn’t that amazing! The number of skills necessary to play the violin and perform in public is astounding. I suggest getting comfortable with recording your child’s recitals so they can be re-experienced. You can check out my website too—it’s all about video recordings. Also—have a few recitals lined up—like going to a nursing home, performing at school etc.

Actually, there is a kind of mass-production feeling to this, with so many kids, many of them playing the same pieces!I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked “Don’t you ever get tired of teaching Twinkle?” The answer is “no”. I’m so wrapped up in what it takes to learn and how each student is different in learning things and how each student performs with a different interpretation that I don’t notice the repertoire as being boring since I teach it over and over again. When parents of Suzuki students are in a social situation many times the conversation turns to “what song is your child learning?” I always recommend people answer by saying ” we’re working on tone and vibrato”, or “rhythm and intonation” rather than the rank of where you are in a book! The other good news about performing the same repertoire is these kids can go anywhere in the world and find someone to play music with!

Maybe that’s the one upside of her picking this darned piece … no other kid would be crazy enough to do this one.Courage and bravery have never been bad attributes…

She hasn’t shown a trace of “stage fright” at any of the previous recitals, but will this be the age when she suddenly develops it?Probably not until she’s a teenager!

Why do I act more worried than she does before every recital, when I’m not the one going up on stage?Because you have to let go. You have no control over the situation.

I hope you enjoy reading this as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it! Best wishes with your future violin and child rearing adventures!

Diane
http://www.myviolinvideos.com
Videos of student violin recitals and violin tutorials.

This topic is locked. No new comments can be posted.

You must log in to post comments.

A note about the discussion forum: Public discussion forum posts are viewable by anyone. Anyone can read the forums, but you must create an account with your email address to post. Private forums are viewable by anyone that is a part of that private forum's group. Discussion forum posts are the opinion of the poster and do not constitute endorsement by or official position of the Suzuki Association of the Americas, Inc.

Please do not use the discussion forums to advertise products or services