Various Violin recordings?

Megan said: Sep 9, 2010
Megan Kelly
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
Alexandria, VA
2 posts

One of my students has an older CD (which is now too scratched to work) that includes piano introductions with each piece. The new CD they purchased, does not include introductions. I can’t find any info online as to how to help them find a CD that does have introdutions and/or accompaniment only tracks.

Does anyone how many different versions are currently available and what is included with each?
-Piano introductions?
—Accompaniment only tracks?
-Tuning pitch?
-Triplet twinkle variation?

Thanks,
Megan

Jennifer Visick said: Sep 9, 2010
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

For Violin Book 1:

performed by David Cerone—has piano introductions. No triplet variation. No accompaniment tracks. no tuning tracks. The twinkle variations all get one track each. This recording has reverb and (IMO) has a more pleasant tone quality, and is nicer to listen to than some of the others.

performed by Davide Nadien—has piano intro for Twinkles only. All the twinkle variations and theme are on 1 track. Has piano accompaniment tracks (there is a metronome click to give tempo at the start of each accompaniment track. No triplet variation. There is an electronic “A” tuning tone just before the accompaniment tracks start. (the accompaniment tracks are, for some strange reason, in backwards order). IMO, his tone quality and musical interpretation, while adequate for the purpose, are lacking in comparison to some of the other recordings.

Linda Perry MIDI Accompaniment CD—Linda’s recordings are good; this is a good option IF you have a home computer with a good sound card and good speakers, or an electronic piano that you can send midi to, or a Disklavier. She does have introductions in her accompaniment recordings, but you can also set the software that comes with it to click a metronome beat for you if you want. The advantage of the MIDI accompaniment software that comes with this is that you can choose the tempo, and even change keys, and it will still sound just as good. (There are some pieces of software or devices that will change a CD’s tempo but the more radically you change the tempo, the worse sound quality you get.) Also, If you put this CD into a regular CD player, it will play Nadien’s recording (but not his accompaniment tracks). [Edit: The MIDI Accompaniment file has the triplet variation; there isn’t a “tuning track” but I assume this is because you’re expected to tune to whatever MIDI instrument you’re playing the MIDI tracks on].

performed by William Preucil Jr.—Revised international edition—has introductions, has triplet twinkle variation, has accompaniment tracks with introductions. No tuning track. I think the “B”s are more in tune on this recording than they are on both the Davids’ recordings.

performed by Shinichi Suzuki—an old recording, not very good sound quality—IMO, don’t get this one

Step by Step Vol 1a & 1b - tuning tracks for all open strings are actual recordings of open strings being played (which seems easier to tune to than an electronic pitch); piano introductions, lots of pre-twinkle stuff for rhythms, open strings, scales, etc.; Has nice accompaniments and “slow” “medium” and “fast” accompaniment versions of most of the pieces (except the ones that Suzuki wrote). The accompaniments are different from the “official published” accompaniment books, but it makes these more interesting and—I think—better, more interesting, and encourage students to play with more flair and musicianship. [Edit: The Gossec: Gavotte accompaniment is recorded with D.C., but without any other repeats.]

Latest Japanese version - (only available for purchase in japan)—has piano introductions, has triplet twinkles, has, in between the violin repertoire recordings and the accompaniment tracks, a bunch of extra tracks that are violin alone:
Open A & E (p. 22 in the Revised International Edition), half scales on A and then E (p.22), then working it’s way up to a 1 octave A major scale and a few arpeggios (p.30), and a half scale in broken thirds on E and on A; open D and open A & both together; then octave Ds in double stops; then a D major scale and arpeggios(p.34), it has the same thing for the G & D strings, G major scale in 2 octaves with arpeggios(p.36). And then a bunch of finger pattern exercises (low 2, low & high 2—p.37). Then double stop exercises G (on D string in 1st pos)-B-G (on e string); back to finger patterns—there is a high 3 exercise (p.40), and THEN come the accompaniment tracks, which also have piano introductions.

Megan said: Sep 10, 2010
Megan Kelly
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
Alexandria, VA
2 posts

Thanks so much for the info. Now I know what to look for. You should get the SAA to publish this on their site!

Megan

said: Sep 11, 2010
 24 posts

Thanks for drawing a comparison between the different editions of the Suzuki Violin School and the Step by Step series. It was a really nice overview and summery of the following recordings for Suzuki Violin Book 1:

  1. David Cerone
  2. David Nadien
  3. Linda Perry MIDI Accompaniment
  4. William Preucil Jr. in Revised international edition
  5. Shinichi Suzuki
  6. Yukari Tate in the latest Japanese version
  7. Rudolf Gaehler & David Andruss in Step by Step, Vol 1a & 1b by Kerstin Wartberg

There has been so much talk about Step-by-Step on this forum. The revised Suzuki books and Step by Step are both Alfred publications but these materials should not be alternatives:

The revised Suzuki book (William Preucil Jr.) is core material and the Step by Step series is a practice help for students and parents. IMO, the best is to work with and to listen to both.

abc123

Thanks so much for the info. Now I know what to look for. You should get the SAA to publish this on their site!

I totally agree with Megan alias abc123.

Jennifer Visick said: Feb 28, 2011
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

Ok, a sort of new-ish publication has come out: Learning Together: Sequential Repertoire for Solo Strings or String Ensemble, by Winifred Crock, William Dick, and Laurie Scott.

(Laurie Scott has taught the “Suzuki in the Schools” teacher training courses for the SAA.).

Because they are designed for heterogeneous classrooms, everything is in D Major. There are versions for violin, viola, cello, and bass. Also, there is a “bass line” included with every song, written at the level that a student can easily play after learning each song, so students can learn to track the harmonic changes (and learn what a bass line is). There is also a slightly more advanced harmony part to each song, in the back of the book.

Now, the reason I posted in this thread: It comes with an audio CD which has audio recordings of the solo instrument plus piano accompaniment as well as the solo instrument in ensemble with the other instruments playing all three parts in the book (melody, harmony, and bass line). I think this ensemble version is a really nice change from playing with “just” piano.

Songs that correspond to Suzuki book 1:

Pre-Twinkle—Chicken on a Fencepost (Var A open strings practice) and Old Brass Wagon (Also Var. A practice, open , 1st, & 2nd finger)

Twinkle
French Folk Song
Lightly Row
Lullaby (aka Go Tell Aunt Rhody)
May Song
Bohemian Folk Song
Rigadoon

Obviously this is a supplement and not a substitute for suzuki students getting one of the various Suzuki “core” repertoire recordings to listen and work with.

Jennifer Gray said: Feb 28, 2011
Jennifer Gray
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
28 posts

the inexplicable reason for all the piano tracks being in reverse order is that the old-school cassette tape format (which seems a faint memory even for us older folks) would run to the end of one side, then be reversed and the tracks would appear on the opposite side of the tape in proper order..seems illogical now, but, it did work then……………………….

Jennifer Visick said: Jul 6, 2012
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

Just found out from Irene on another thread (here: https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/5606/#c12515 ) that there is another set of recordings for the Violin Suzuki books out there!

Recorded by Takako Nishizaki in albums called “Suzuki Evergreens”. These ones are available on iTunes! (I think all of the “official” Suzuki recordings should be available on iTunes, or Amazon download, or at least available for download from the ISA or SAA website…)

I haven’t listened to them yet, so no report on what they contain in terms of accompaniment tracks, introductions and tuning notes, but perhaps someone else can chime in with the info? It looks like, from a cursory glance at iTunes, that there are recordings of the “original” form of some of the pieces alongside the piano/violin arrangement found in the Suzuki books (I like that idea). Also, it looks like there is what they are calling a “piano predominant” version, which would be similar, I think, to the way the Nadien CD’s “accompaniment” tracks come out: faint violin and very loud piano.

Teresa said: Jul 13, 2012
Teresa Skinner
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
69 posts

Regarding the new Book 1 cd available only in Japan, does anyone know what the JAN catalog number might be? (it’s like an ISBN number in the US)

Teresa

…if you listen to the music, it tells you what to do…

Gianmaria Lari said: Apr 27, 2015
 1 posts

Where can I find a sample of the linda Perry midi file?
Does the midi files contains the whole scores with all the instruments or just the piano?

Thank you!!
g.

Jennifer Visick said: May 7, 2015
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

The Linda Perry midi files are just piano accompaniments.

Jennifer Visick said: Jan 22, 2016
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

So I was wandering through a violinshop the other day and realized that Kerstin Wartberg’s Trio Book has a CD. Which I bought.

So you can hear all of Suzuki violin book 1 and 2 in violin-trio format. And, as I mentioned before with the Learning Together recordings… I like the idea of exposing the students to playing with other ensemble types than just piano with violin melody most of the time.

:-)

  • Contains Twinkle Variation A (only) and Theme, plus all other pieces in violin books 1-2

  • There are harp introductions to each piece similar to the piano introductions on other recordings (the songs themselves are recordings of three violins in ensemble with each other, not accompanied by harp).

(Which are very nice and make me want to have a harpist accompany all of my students one day. Which reminds me of stringsalong.com… although I do wish they would have an option to buy, not just subscribe)

  • These recordings are just a bit slower than the Nadien recordings.

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