Theory materials for 4-5 year old piano student?

Connie Sunday said: May 17, 2009
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

I normally use the Theory Time workbooks, but the first one says it’s suitable for ages 6-7. Could anyone recommend some play/coloring book type materials for a four, nearly five year old piano student?

Thanks!

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Laura said: May 19, 2009
 
Suzuki Association Member
Piano
358 posts

While I have not used the materials myself (I usually wait until 6-7 for theory), the Music For Little Mozarts series might be of interest. It’s a reading-based approach to music learning, so you might choose to de-emphasize the “learn to play by reading” parts for the time being if it conflicts with your Suzuki approach.

It has lots of colorful (and very cute!) pictures, stories, and quite a bit of music theory content that are highly suitable for the 4-5 year old set. In addition to the music lesson books, there are supplementary materials such as coloring books, ear training materials, theory flash cards, and… oh gosh… CDs of all of the repertoire!! (Non-Suzuki programs using recordings? Caving into the enemy!! :shock: )

OK, seriously again, would nobody PLEASE take or quote me out of context regarding de-emphasizing the learning to read part! We’re not due to open up that annual can of worms again for at least another… oh, 8 months?? :)

Barb said: May 20, 2009
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Can you give me a link to Theory Time workbooks or any other favourites for about 6-7-8 years old?

I have a student who came to me reading music last fall, but has since changed piano teachers and has more or less stopped reading! He is very bright and learns by ear and memorizes easily. I have continued to put the music in front of him most of the time because he could read, but have not emphasized reading. He is trying to get by without reading at all now, even when I ask him to, and apparently also in his piano lessons. So his mom has asked if I could teach take a second day a week to teach him theory next year.

Thank you!

Barb

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Connie Sunday said: May 20, 2009
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

Sure; the Theory Time materials are listed last under

Violin, Viola & Piano Theory
http://beststudentviolins.com/sheetmusic.html#vltheory

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Barb said: May 26, 2009
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Thank you!

Has anyone used Rabbit Man Music Books? http://www.musicedmarket.com/products/methods/vfseries.html and https://www.ymonline.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id=146

Look like they might be good for the younger set. I’ve decided to order a set and see what they are like.

Barb

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Rachel Schott said: Jun 9, 2009
Rachel SchottViolin
Harrogate, TN
127 posts

Check out Music Mind Games—interactive, noncompetative card games that the little ones can really dig. http://www.musicmindgames.com

I use the same set of materials for all of my students, as there are baziliions of games that go from very easy (4-5 year old set) to pretty darn tricky (pre-teens).

Carol Anderson said: Jun 10, 2009
Carol Anderson
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education, Piano, Cello, Viola
9 posts

I’ve been a violin teacher for over twenty years and have found a need for more directed music theory….mono-focused and simplified. For my students, I’ve written workbooks for each of the songs the students learn and add not only additional fun songs on their level but a music theory game into each workbook. But for group lessons, I wrote simple music theory games. They get very involved as they progress but the game that would benefit anyone is ‘Beginner Spit-cato’ and ‘Advanced Spit-cato’. It is a fast simple game the kids love and teaches the order of notes. Once this concept is learned, intervals and chords come easy. There were so many requests by teachers and students that I put them on a website in the form of e-books. I suggest you print them on card stock and laminate them. There are also piano flash cards in e-book form. Just make them into 8 1/2 by 11 boards first and have the student place the cards on the board. No tests, just repetition. Eventually, you can walk away from the crutch of the boards and play the games. Have fun!

A 4-5 year old needs to learn the names of the notes and how they relate to one another before you can introduce complicated theory. As my little two year old students fumble over a concept, I put up another game or e-book that has helped them for everyone to use. If you have questions, please feel free to email me. http://www.carolanderson@scalesarentjustafishthing.com
The e-books can be found in the shopping cart under games.

My website is: scalesarentjustafishthing.com

Barb said: Jun 28, 2009
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Carol, I LOVE your website (and the “scales are not just a fish thing” name, too)! I love teaching with games—and kids love learning with games!
Some great articles, and fun to watch your lessons videos, too! I’ll be signing up on your mailing list soon.

Barb

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Carol Anderson said: Jun 28, 2009
Carol Anderson
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education, Piano, Cello, Viola
9 posts

Barb,
Thanks so much for the encouragement.

I’m so glad that all the hard work of taking what I do for my students and putting it into E-book form is improving the excellence of music education. It probably seems strange that I focus so much energy on bringing to light our unique learning styles and personalities when we are discussing music education. I think it is essential to know a little about the different way in which we process information if we are to improve the way we absorb that information. We could go around kicking ourselves for not having another individual’s abilities for the rest of our lives when, if we only understood the layers that make us each unique, we could start to nurture our gifts and appreciate others.

The music theory games are especially fun for me. I have to say, they really increase your IQ. Beside teaching Suzuki violin, I have a degree in psychology. I often work with kids who have some sort of undiagnosed learning difference. I don’t care what the ‘tests’ have defined as the issue, I believe that if we exercise the brain, the amazing organ that it is, it will heal itself and start to work better. I don’t mean to say that the games will make us all geniuses, but they sure will keep our minds working proactively. I pressure the brain’s dominance by adding more and more challenges to it. Funny how you can watch the short circuits in the beginning of the games and exercises and then see the brain remedy what it was lacking. I probably should write an E-book about the 7 week program that some of my students have chosen to go through that forces the brain to work faster. These music theory games are a bit of an outgrowth from that seven week experiment. When I was getting my psychology degree, I worked with a number of different people to see if the same daily and weekly exercise habits would help them emerge from their problem. I have to say it did. There are some problems that need medicine, of course, but some that simply need to get healthy and exercise.

I’m starting to have a little following of ‘newbie’ teachers using the games, teacher bits, workbooks, and an insider understanding of the unique learning personality of the student from their first lesson. I’m so glad that the students will receive the richness of the Suzuki literature and the fillers of the music theory games and workbooks so that, by the time they are finished Book 1, they are miles ahead of most music students.

I have parents insisting that their teenagers continue even during the difficult years. My seniors, this year, informed me that they were coming to group lessons even if they had the flu. What joy is mine.

I’m overwhelmed by the encouragement and hope that I can continue to create materials that improve the excellence of music education for everyone—even in this economy.

Barb, thanks again.
Carol

Carol Anderson said: Jul 10, 2009
Carol Anderson
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education, Piano, Cello, Viola
9 posts

I just put up a card game, First Position Playing Cards, in the games section of the shopping cart in
http://www.scalesarentjustafishthing.com. I’ll make it free for the next day or so in case any of you would like to get it. It is in E-book form and has two card games to teach the note on the staff and it’s relationship to the note on the fingerboard.

Have fun!!
Carol

Sue Hunt said: Jul 3, 2011
Sue Hunt
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Violin
389 posts

I had a look for this site and it seems to have disappeared. Does anyone know what’s happened?

Carol Anderson said: Feb 26, 2013
Carol Anderson
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education, Piano, Cello, Viola
9 posts

I have a free Beginner Bowing Book available on Kindle tomorrow, Wednesday 2/27/13. It is best to view it from an iPad. Also, the associated books that work through each finger at a time on the violin are only $20.00 each tomorrow on my website. The books come with a play-along DVD of all the songs in the book in the book. Let me know what you think of them. Any requests for a private viewing of the digital books, just email me at: [javascript protected email address]
Together we can raise the bar on music education…if that is still possible.
spiral bound books are found at: http://scalesarentjustafishthing.com

http://www.amazon.com/Beginner-Bowing-Companion-Books-ebook/dp/B00AW15RF0/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1361911309&sr=1-1&keywords=carol+anderson+beginner+bowing+book

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