Helpful supplemental video series for Suzuki teachers/students!

Jaclyn Kim said: Apr 9, 2019
Jaclyn Kim
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
5 posts

Some of my students listen to fast recordings and try to play their pieces too fast, too soon! I have recorded the Suzuki Book 1 pieces at a slower (practice tempo) in hopes that they learn to practice slowly. Feel free to like, subscribe, and share any videos that are helpful to you and your students!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9my1DcBfkg

Last summer I attended Suzuki Training for Unit 1 at Claremont and found it incredibly useful. I grew up as a Suzuki student and now that my private studio is growing, I wanted to go back to receive training as a teacher. Listening is a huge part of being a musician and unfortunately my students do not have/listen to their CD’s enough. I started a YouTube channel so that my students have one more outlet to get their listening in, but also for the newer students to understand and visualize a recital setting. Please subscribe, like, and share if this is useful for you and your students!

Jaclyn Kim

Joanne Shannon said: Apr 10, 2019
Joanne Shannon
Suzuki Association Member
Piano
Los Angeles, CA
140 posts

In reply to the recordings being up to tempo….:When a baby is born and lies in its crib listening to its surroundings, I doubt very much that it concerns itself with the speed of its parent’s voice….yet within two years, the baby becomes capable of imitating what it has been hearing. And when it starts really talking, the baby does not talk slowly but tries to imitate the parents. (Remember the gabidy-gook you tried to translate?) My only remedy to these “fast” stages of playing is to include in the assignments “super slow”. In other words, after the first note has been played, the student must wait for the word “next”. After that note is played the student waits for the word “next”, etc. until the piece is completed. I only do this in book one. This may sound difficult to you, but ALL my students do it for book one and even the six year olds have absolutely no problem. This also presents the opportunity to repeat a note if it is needed. And keep in mind, this is on the piano so both hands(two notes) are involved and as they are with the strings(fingers & bow). This is, of course, done after the notes, bowing, etc. of he piece is secure. After that they learn to play with the metronome which not only encourages steady tempos, but the speed can be controlled by teacher and parent.

The only time I have slowed a recording down is some book 5 or 6 pieces where each note was not clear on the recordings. “Transcribe” is a good program for that.

Jaclyn Kim said: Apr 10, 2019
Jaclyn Kim
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
5 posts

Thank you for your comment! That’s an awesome idea and I’m glad it works for you and your students! I’ll probably try that as well. Slow practice is so good for learning how to prepare.

Jaclyn Kim

Anita Knight said: Apr 10, 2019
Anita Knight
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education
Kent, WA
26 posts

Yes, YES to this! Its a huge challenge for kids to learn new pieces at a tempo
slow enough to play accurately. I applaud you for making this happen for your studio!

This is exactly why I love Kerstin Wartberg’s “Step by Step” books, fully endorsed by Dr. Suzuki. Each piece (now published through bk 5) is practiced at 3 tempos with previews & piano accompaniment. It has been a total game changer for my studio—we all LOVE playing with the recordings, there’s always a tempo that matches their ability, and they sound so good!

Anita Knight
“Joyful Sound Violin Studio”

Jaclyn Kim said: Apr 11, 2019
Jaclyn Kim
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
5 posts

Thank you Anita! I’ve heard about that book! I need it read it myself still.

Jaclyn Kim

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