Special Guest Speakers & Workshop Clinicians


Peter Jutras

Pete Jutras

Peter Jutras, Ph.D., NCTM, is a Professor of Piano and the Piano Pedagogy and Group Piano Specialist at the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at the University of Georgia in Athens, GA. He is the Editor-in-Chief ofClavier Companionmagazine, a leading national piano pedagogy publication.Jutrasalso served as Editor-in-Chief ofKeyboard Companionfrom 2007-2008.

Dr. Jutras has published articles and research inThe Journal of Research in Music Education,The Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Scientia Paedagogica Experimentalis, American Music Teacher,Clavier Companion, Keyboard Companion, Music Matters,andGeorgia Music News.He has conducted extensive research on adult music study, specifically on the benefits of adult piano study and the benefits of participation in New Horizons Bands.

Dr. Jutras is a frequent presenter at conferences across the country and around the world, and recent presentations include the ISME World Conference and national conferences of CMS, MENC, AERA, and MTNA in locations such as Albuquerque, Atlanta, Beijing, Bologna, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, New York City, Ottawa, Portland, Thessaloniki, Toronto, Vancouver, and Dublin. Recent invitations have brought his lectures to The Eastman School of Music, George Mason University, Southern Methodist University, St. Olaf College, and The University of Oklahoma.

A Nationally Certified Teacher of Music, Jutras holds the B.M. degree in music education from the Eastman School of Music, the M.M. degree in piano performance and pedagogy from Southern Methodist University, and the Ph.D. in music education with an emphasis in piano pedagogy from the University of North Texas.His pedagogical training included work with Tony Caramia, Sam Holland, and Fred Kern. Dr. Jutras lives in Athens, GA, with his wife Kristin, a professional violinist, and their two sons, James and Andrew.

Dr. Jutras was named a University Service Learning Fellow for 2014-2015.


Teri Einfeldt

Teri Einfeldt

Teri Einfeldt is chair of the Suzuki department and adjunct professor at the University of Hartford’s The Hartt School and assistant director of The Hartt School Suzuki Institute. An SAA
registered teacher trainer, Teri is a frequent clinician at workshops and institutes throughout the United States


Kay Collier McLaughlin

Kay Collier McLaughlin

Kay Collier McLaughlin (formerly Kay Collier-Slone) describes herself as a Suzuki teacher specializing in social change. She holds a Doctorate in Counseling Psychology from The Union Institute with sub-specialities in single adult development, leadership development, group dynamics and bereavement. The author of the Talent Education classic, They’re Rarely Too Young and Never Too Old to ‘Twinkle,’ her most recent book is entitled Talking Together: how to get beyond polarization and see and hear each other through civil dialogue, and is deeply rooted in the philosophy and methodology of Dr. Shinichi Suzuki. One of the early Suzuki teachers in the United States, Collier McLaughlin founded the Lexington Talent Education Association, and with her daughter Diane Slone and Joanna Binford, cofounded Suzuki Talent Education of the Bluegrass. A former member of the Board of Suzuki Talent Education, teacher trainer, workshop leader both nationally and internationally, it was her work with the psychology of the Suzuki triangle and method which led her to doctoral studies in psychology, and subsequently, to her work in leadership development with special interest in family systems, emotional intelligence and other important theories and practices.

Kay currently travels the country as a leadership consultant with special focus on teaching civil dialogue. She lives on a small lake in Central Kentucky with her master woodworker husband Raymond, where she has a studio for her writing and her work as a collage artist known as L’ art du Papier

She is the proud grandmother of Virginia, 21, a recent musical theater graduate who performed on Broadway this winter with Kristin Chenowith; Drew, 15, who keeps her busy attending baseball and football games and Mary Chun, soon to be 13, who is currently in an international school in HongKong and great at guiding her grandmother around when she visits. In her spare time, she is teaching herself to play the folk harp.


Margaret Watts Romney

Margaret Watts Romney

Margaret’s early professional life centered around all things related to the cello: performing, teaching, arranging music, and directing events. Awards included scholarships to attend Idyllwild Arts Academy, University of Arizona School of Music with Peter Rejto, and Westminster College’s Master of Strategic Communication Program as well. After years of connecting to people through music, she shifted to connecting people through words and ideas. Margaret has been nicknamed “The Benevolent Story Extractor” for her uncanny ability to be supportive, directive, and entertaining as she leads unforgettable workshops, writes, or interviews fascinating people. She is the producer and host of the SAA Podcast, “Building Noble Hearts: Inside a Teaching Community.” Her free time is filled with hiking, biking the paths of Boulder, CO, and reveling in her three grown daughters’ marvelous lives.


Elayne Ras

Elayne Ras

Elayne Ras began Suzuki violin lessons at the age of 11 at the first Suzuki school in Toronto, after taking piano lessons with her mother since age 5. She received her Honours Bachelor in Music Performance & her BA in Psychology from the University of Western Ontario and was certified as a Suzuki Violin Teacher Trainer in 2002. Elayne has been a clinician for numerous Suzuki workshops and institutes in Canada and the US, has adjudicated at music festivals around Ontario and Alberta, and served 10 years on the board of the Suzuki Association of Ontario, including a term as Chair. She performed with the Stratford Symphony Orchestra for 5 years, is now a member of the Guelph Symphony, and conducted a community band of all ages in Goderich for 19 years. Now living in Rockwood, she teaches full-time with the Suzuki String School of Guelph, after teaching with Huron String School in Goderich for 26 years. Elayne is currently the Director of the Southwestern Ontario Suzuki Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, and was invited to tour China as a member of the Ontario Festival Symphony Orchestra over the Christmas break, 2011-12. Recently Elayne completed a Certificate in Applied Positive Psychology in Toronto, Ontario, given by the Flourishing Centre, and she is excited to be able to apply principles of Positive Psychology in her studio, and in her teacher training classes.


Jan Coleman

Jan Coleman, co-founder of the Coleman Violin Studio in Seattle, specializes in teaching form and how it affects every aspect of playing, including intonation, tone production, and expression. Her students are international and span all levels. Students who have started lessons with Ms. Coleman have won 1st Prize in numerous international and national competitions, including the Menuhin and Stuhlberg International Competitions, and the MTNA National Solo Competition, and have been major prizewinners in the Johansen International String Competition and the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition. Students whom she has started or worked with on form have performed as soloists with numerous orchestras, including the Seattle and Houston Symphonies, London’s Philharmonia Orchestra, Berlin’s Konzerthaus Orchestra, and Orchestre de la Suisse Romande. They have gone on to study at prestigious conservatories such as Juilliard, Curtis, and Colburn, and hold positions, including concertmaster, in major orchestras. An internationally sought-after clinician, Ms. Coleman has studied violin pedagogy with prominent Suzuki teachers such as Michele George of the Cleveland Institute of Music, Edward Kreitman, and Stevie Sandven. She incorporates traditional violin teaching techniques of many teachers, including Ivan Galamian, Dorothy Delay, and Paul Rolland, as well as those of her Studio colleagues, Kent Coleman and Simon James. Ms. Coleman studied violin performance with Kato Havas in London and obtained her music degree at Wichita State University, majoring in violin under the tutelage of James Ceasarwhile performing as a violinist in the Wichita Symphony.  Her violin teacher in high school was her then classmate and later husband, Kent Coleman, with whom she collaborated in teaching for many years until his untimely death in 2007.  Since then, she has collaborated with Simon James, a concertmaster of the Seattle Symphony, whose daughters she was teaching at that time. The legacy that she started with her husband many years ago has continued to flourish, becoming one of the premier violin studios in the world.


Danae Witter

Danae Witter, American violinist and violist,received her Doctorate of Musical Arts Degree in May 2011 from the University of Southern California, including a minor in theory analysis and electives in viola and music education.Ms. Witter has served as Operations Director and member of the Violin and Viola Faculties at the International Music Academy ofPilsen, CZ and Cambridge International String Academy of Cambridge, UK. As an orchestral player, she has performed in the motion picture recording industry in Los Angeles. Ms. Witter is an accomplished writer and served as an Associate Editor to theSevcikproject published by LaurenKeiserPublishing Company in New York. Ms. Witter has also been actively involved in Music Industry, employed as the Director of theSHARViolin Shop in Ann Arbor, MI from 2012-2016 and now as the Suzuki Editor andStrategist at Alfred Music.


Alice Ann O’Neill

Alice Ann O’Neill

Dr. Alice Ann M. O’Neill, professional cellist and teacher, attended Boston University to study cello performance, and subsequently obtained a master’s degree in cello performance and Suzuki pedagogy from Western Illinois University, and a doctorate from The Ohio State University, in cello performance and string pedagogy. She has performed in professional orchestras and chamber ensembles, and as a solo cellist throughout Europe, Canada, and the U.S.

Dr. O’Neill has extensive teaching experience and specializes in the Suzuki method as a cello teacher trainer. She has taught many clinics and workshops concerning many aspects of pedagogy and presented at state and international education conferences. Her research articles have been published in The Journal of Research in Music Education, the American Suzuki Journal, and the Vincentian Heritage Journal. Her cello students have appeared on NPR’s “From the Top,” and won top prizes at the St. Paul’s String Quartet and Fischoff chamber music competitions. Several cello students of Dr. O’Neill have continued their studies at schools such as Rice University-Shepherd School of Music, Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, Cleveland Institute of Music, Catholic University of America, Aspen Music Festival, Meadowmount School of Music, Indiana University, Harvard University, and the Juilliard School in New York City.

Currently, Dr. O’Neill is professor of cello, teaches chamber music and string pedagogy, and supervises new teachers at Mount St. Joseph University and directs the Mount St. Joseph Talent Education program in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is a Catholic nun and member of the Sisters of Charity.


Winifred Crock

Winifred Crock

Winifred Crock was the Director of Orchestras at Parkway Central High School for
over twenty-five years, and has maintained a private violin studio in suburban St. Louis, Missouri for far longer. During her tenure, Parkway Central High was selected as a GRAMMY Gold Signature school, and the orchestra program garnered much acclaim. Mrs. Crock has been named the Missouri ASTA Private Studio Teacher of the Year, the Missouri ASTA Secondary String Teacher of the Year, the St. Louis Symphony Educator of the Year, and the NFHS Outstanding Music Educator of Missouri. Mrs. Crock is also the recipient of the University of Rochester’s Singer Prize for excellence in secondary teaching and the 2014 ASTA Elizabeth Green National School Educator Award.

In demand as a clinician, lecturer and conductor, Mrs. Crock has lectured at numerous music conferences including Midwest, NAFME, ASTA, and SAA conferences and has been the featured string clinician at festivals and conferences in over 20 states, and abroad. In addition to music degrees from SIU Edwardsville and Kent State University, Mrs. Crock graduated from the Suzuki Talent Education Institute in Matsumoto, Japan under the tutelage of Shinichi Suzuki and is a certified Kodály instructor through the Kodály Center of America in Boston. Mrs. Crock, with Mr. William Dick and Dr. Laurie Scott, are the co-authors of Learning Together: Sequential Repertoire for Solo Strings or String Ensembles, Alfred Music. They were the recipients of the Suzuki Association of the Americas 2011 Community Learning Award for their work in developing the Suzuki Method in schools. Mrs. Crock is currently completing a beginning reading series called Pattern Play for Strings: A Sequential Introduction to Reading Music, Forrester Press.

Mrs. Crock is dedicated to the betterment of music education for all children.


Carrie Reuning-Hummel

Carrie Reuning-Hummel

Carrie Reuning-Hummel began the study of the violin at the age of five with her parents, Joan and Sanford Reuning in Ithaca, New York. She was one of the first Suzuki students in the U.S. and studied with Shinichi Suzuki on numerous occasions.

Carrie is very active as a Suzuki teacher and a registered Suzuki Teacher Trainer. She has taught at hundreds of institutes and workshops throughout the continental U.S. as well as in Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, and Israel. In 1986 she was honored to receive the Shar Distinguished Young Teacher Award. Carrie served on the national Board of Directors of the Suzuki Association of the Americas for six years.

Carrie received a BA in Psychology from the University of Iowa and is a professional violist and an active performer. She recently completed a Master’s of Science degree in Communications at Ithaca College, writing a thesis on powerful learning experiences. Carrie home-schooled her two children and is interested in exploring parent/child practice partnerships with families. She has written a book called “Time to Practice: A Companion for Parents.”