Scale Books

Virginia Thompson said: Jul 6, 2011
Virginia ThompsonViolin, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Viola
Saint Petersburg, FL
17 posts

Does anyone know of a really good scale book for three octave scales. I just want a scale book that starts on one note and goes up three octaves, back down and then the arpeggios. There are so many scale books out there that are more like an etude study then there are just the straight scale. My students need this type of scale book for their auditions to join our local youth orchestras. I normally write my own since nothing I’ve found meets my students needs.

Virginia Thompson
www.thompsonsmusic.com
727.576.0166

Sue Hunt said: Jul 6, 2011
Sue Hunt
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Violin
390 posts

Doesn’t Barbara Barber do one?

Jane Gitter said: Jul 6, 2011
 Violin, Viola
Ottawa, ON
2 posts

My former teacher, Bob Skelton, published this book with the Royal Conservatory some years ago:

http://www.metzlerviolins.com/p-217726-skeltonrobertthe-complete-violin-technique-book.aspx

It’s very clearly laid out by key with 1, 2 and 3 octaves.

Gail said: Jul 6, 2011
 
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Cello, Viola
4 posts

Hi Virginia!

If your students are going into a youth orchestra situation, then I highly recommend:

“Advanced Technique for Strings” by Michael Allen, Robert Gillespie, and Pamela Telejohn Hayes—published by Hal Leonard.

It has all the 3 octave scales and arpeggios, sound shifting exercises for 1st to third position, and for 5th and 7th for violins. Viola has 1st, 3rd and 5th , and reading treble cleff.

Those of us with strong background in public school orchestra programs and youth orchestras find this book indespensable. It covers the material, without being an etude book.. It was designed to be used in heterogeneous string classes, but I use it extensively in my private studio , as well.

Teri said: Jul 6, 2011
Teri EinfeldtTeacher Trainer
Institute Director
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
West Hartford, CT
367 posts

I highly recommend “Scales for the Advanced Violinist” by Barbara Barber. It is similar to Flesch but much more student friendly. I use this with all my students beginning around BK 4 depending on the child.
Teri

Jacob Litoff said: Jul 6, 2011
 
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Cello, Viola
Millis, MA
46 posts

I highly recommend Amy Matherly’s “Progressive Scales For Violin—Scales and arpeggios in one , two and three octaves”

My students do that book first, then progress to either Carl Flesch or Galamian Scale books.

Virginia Thompson said: Jul 8, 2011
Virginia ThompsonViolin, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Viola
Saint Petersburg, FL
17 posts

Thank you so much I will check out these,. I have used Barbar Barber’s but it’s too difficult for some students. I think it would be great if someone in the Suzuki program could just do the scales 1, 2, and 3 octave scales and arpeggios only with a CD. I just purchased the three books on the website and it promised 1,2, and 3 octave scales. I feel I’d need some training on how they want the mastering technique taught specifically. A teacher’s manual would be good?

Virginia Thompson
www.thompsonsmusic.com
727.576.0166

Virginia Thompson said: Jul 8, 2011
Virginia ThompsonViolin, Guitar, Piano, Cello, Viola
Saint Petersburg, FL
17 posts

Anyone have any thoughts on William Starr’s Scales Plus book? He’s one of our number one teacher’s maybe this is best? It teaches all levels, but I really want a book with straight scales and arpeggios all the other stuff can be taught with etude study books etc. Love to know your thoughts. Also I buy wholesale. Any good wholesale companies for Suzuki materials other than Shar/M&M.
Also our studio is looking for teaching voice books. Where can I buy Conne books wholesale. Lots of questions. I love this forum.
Virginia

Virginia Thompson
www.thompsonsmusic.com
727.576.0166

Geralyn Theobald said: Aug 3, 2011
 Violin, Viola
Tallahassee, FL
4 posts

I’ve been using Allen Lieb’s recommendation:
Scale and Chord Exercises, by Ritter-Stoessel.

Easy to read, flexible system for the intermediate student
w/o stacks and stacks of fingerings!

Includes:

Major, melodic + harmonic minor scales + arpeggi, beg. w/ 2 octaves.
The tonic is repeated, avoiding the initial difficulty of stringing multiple octaves together.
M, m triads + dominant/diminished 7th chords (in 2 + 3 octaves); chromatic scales; 3rds, 6ths, octaves, 10ths, WT scale.

I use the 2 octave scales beginning in Book 3 and start the 3 octave scales in Book 4.

LOVE that all the scales are written out and easy to SEE!
Doubling the tonic works instantly and saves loads of time—students don’t forget which scale they’re playing when they’re shifting around on a new scale. Better intonation in the upper register.

I advance to Flesch or Galamian AFTER this book!

geralyn

A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin;
what else does a man need to be happy?
Albert Einstein

Connie Sunday said: Aug 3, 2011
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

@Geralyn: I looked for the Ritter-Stoessel and only found the one book; are there several books, or are those chapters?

I collect scale books, and I’m currently using Lisa Berman’s Book of Scales & Arpeggios in One, Two and Three Octaves (Based on Flesch):

http://www.simplyviolin.com/page5/page82/page82.html

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Geralyn Theobald said: Aug 3, 2011
 Violin, Viola
Tallahassee, FL
4 posts

I probably was unclear above—

The Ritter-Stoessel book, Scale and Chord Exercises, is just one book.
When my students are in Suzuki Vln Bk 3, I start them w/ this scale book, using the
2 octave scale section (non-shifting and shifting 2 octave scales are included).
When my students are in Suzuki Bk 4, I introduce 3 octave scales, which are in the same book. I do like Barbara Barber’s scale book, which has a wonderful way of introducing octaves, so I do introduce octaves her way. Later, I move my students to Galamian or Flesch, which I think they need to be familiar w/ before entering college. I find these advanced scale books difficult to read and impossible for young students to negotiate.

The Yost System is pretty cool, challenging, and can be taught to advanced, young students.
Wish I could track the Yost System down now. Anybody have a lead?

geralyn

A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin;
what else does a man need to be happy?
Albert Einstein

Diane said: Aug 4, 2011
Diane AllenViolin
245 posts

http://myviolinvideos.com/blog38vescales.html

These are visual charts of the 3 octave scales.

True to Suzuki fashion—I teach these first then have students read the music later using Barbara Barber’s scale book. That way they can focus on learning the technique of the scales and practice reading the music later once they have the scales memorized.

Diane
http://www.myviolinvideos.com
Videos of student violin recitals and violin tutorials.

Jennifer Visick said: Aug 16, 2011
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

Why don’t you just write out your own scales and exercises the way that you want your students to practice them? There are plenty of free or cheap music engraving programs out there that will allow you to do that, and print them yourself.

Or, make it a teaching point that your students need to write out their own scales and the fingerings. Teach them how to write music. And then teach them how to use music engraving software.

You must log in to post comments.

A note about the discussion forum: Public discussion forum posts are viewable by anyone. Anyone can read the forums, but you must create an account with your email address to post. Private forums are viewable by anyone that is a part of that private forum's group. Discussion forum posts are the opinion of the poster and do not constitute endorsement by or official position of the Suzuki Association of the Americas, Inc.

Please do not use the discussion forums to advertise products or services