Bowhold issues

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said: Dec 2, 2010
 5 posts

Does anyone have any good devices or games to help kids with their bow holds? I have a few students who are really struggling with their fingers staying in place. I do the typical “up like a rocket” stuff a lot and have made pinkie palaces before (I don’t really use them anymore), but I would love to see your other ideas too!

Ruth Brons said: Dec 2, 2010
Ruth Brons
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Livingston, NJ
148 posts

I invented these, the Bow Hold Buddies instant bow hold accessories,
for my own students to keep their fingers relaxed and in position until muscle memory can take over.
I love seeing beginning students move through more music sooner
because we no longer have to do bow hold drills and repeated bow hold corrections!
You may view short videos on How to Use and How to Install on the website below.

Best Wishes,

Alie said: Dec 2, 2010
 Violin
Columbus, OH
21 posts

Just out of curiosity, why don’t you use the “pinkie palaces” anymore? What specifically do you make them out of? I have experimented with a gazillion different pinkie gadgets and always LOVE to hear feedback from other teachers about what works for them and what doesn’t work. I used to use corn pads because that’s what was put on my bow back when I was a little tot!

Just recently, the old director of my program used to make pinkie nests out of fimo. The kids liked them but I thought they often sat up a little too high. They can probably be made using a thinner piece of fimo. I have used pvc pipes to create a pinkie nest. I went through a phase where I would simply put a “mini glue dot” (not a dot of glue but a very small disk shaped adhesive material. Here is a link: http://www.gluedots.com/display/router.aspx?DocID=1007 ) in the spot that I wanted the pinkie, thumb, etc. to rest. I now usually build a “pinkie nest” out of blue tape, which is an idea that I gleaned from Mimi Zweig. It works pretty well as far as devices go.

I have run the gambit with devices from the virtuoso wrist aid, bow trackers, bow stoppers, bowrights. Chris Daring has a device called the Bow Genie which I have used and like for beginners who still have “outie bowhold”. I plan to try the Bow Buddies.

My feeling is that mechanical devices have very specific uses and can be very beneficial, but also can become a crutch if used incorrectly. It seems that certain things work with certain students, but may cause even more problems for other students. I would love to hear specific feedback form other teachers regarding what they have tried and their experiences.

said: Dec 3, 2010
 5 posts

I used electrical tape, and it just didn’t stay. I do like the corn pads. I have trouble with some of my kids wanting to put all their fingers on the top of their bow (remedial students from another teacher).

said: Dec 12, 2010
 0 posts

I am using for my children Bowhold buddies but no one is well. Please suggest for me. Thanks

Phankao said: Dec 24, 2010
Phankao WanPiano, Viola, Violin
128 posts

missaliej

Hi,

Just out of curiosity, why don’t you use the “pinkie palaces” anymore? What specifically do you make them out of? I have experimented with a gazillion different pinkie gadgets and always LOVE to hear feedback from other teachers about what works for them and what doesn’t work. I used to use corn pads because that’s what was put on my bow back when I was a little tot!

Just recently, the old director of my program used to make pinkie nests out of fimo. The kids liked them but I thought they often sat up a little too high. They can probably be made using a thinner piece of fimo. I have used pvc pipes to create a pinkie nest. I went through a phase where I would simply put a “mini glue dot” (not a dot of glue but a very small disk shaped adhesive material. Here is a link: http://www.gluedots.com/display/router.aspx?DocID=1007 ) in the spot that I wanted the pinkie, thumb, etc. to rest. I now usually build a “pinkie nest” out of blue tape, which is an idea that I gleaned from Mimi Zweig. It works pretty well as far as devices go.

I have run the gambit with devices from the virtuoso wrist aid, bow trackers, bow stoppers, bowrights. Chris Daring has a device called the Bow Genie which I have used and like for beginners who still have “outie bowhold”. I plan to try the Bow Buddies.

My feeling is that mechanical devices have very specific uses and can be very beneficial, but also can become a crutch if used incorrectly. It seems that certain things work with certain students, but may cause even more problems for other students. I would love to hear specific feedback form other teachers regarding what they have tried and their experiences.

May i ask what are palace pinkies? What do they look like? Any photos?

The bowhold buddies are really cumbersome by the way. So huge even for my adult hands. And the owner admitted that it’s not suitable for the very young when I commented on this to her.

phan

Ruth Brons said: Dec 24, 2010
Ruth Brons
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Livingston, NJ
148 posts

Bow Hold Buddies[tm] accessories are not suitable for children under 3 years old, but work beautifully to positioin fingers and relax the hands of beginning students ages 3 and up.

Phankao said: Dec 24, 2010
Phankao WanPiano, Viola, Violin
128 posts

ruthbrons

Bow Hold Buddies[tm] accessories are not suitable for children under 3 years old, but work beautifully to positioin fingers and relax the hands of beginning students ages 3 and up.

Yes, my youngest is just 2 years old and he has not started formal lessons at all. Can imagine how the bowhold buddies would be huge on his beautiful and slim 1/32 violin bow. In any case, it is large for my 44 year old hands too.

I wish someone would design something slimmer that is a slip-on instead of having the need to unscrew and put the item in. I was trying to expore putting a few different types of pencil grips together with the toyo type right in front for the thumb/index, except that these also need to be put through the bowstick. When I slice thru the side of a pencil grip, it no longer slips onto the bow-stick and stays on well.

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