bow hold glove made of made of jell

Tags: ,

Cynthia Faisst said: Feb 17, 2010
Cynthia Faisst
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education
Irvine, CA
127 posts

Before the holidays started last Fall—

I found a website filled with music education materials that included a device created by a physical therapist for helping students with their weak double jointed fingers when making a bow hold.

Insightfully this therapist understood that the problem was not with having the strength to grab something but not being able to lift the joints to form a circle. So they created a scaffold that would stay inside the hand with out slipping away. It must be based on something that physical therapist are already using.

The device was made of a soft jelly like silicon glove with holes for the fingers that did not cover the entire hand and had no finger tips. Between the fingers and thumb area they attached a soft squishy ball that filled the hollow of the palm. The effect was like having a big noodle shape that filled the space between the palm and the bow while the fingers held the bow.

When I went back to find it the page was missing. I can not remember what it was called. No matter what search terms I use I can not find it again.

If any of you have used this device with students or know where I can find it again please let me know.

It did a great job of keep the thumb and pointer finger from collapsing while bringing the finger tips together on the bow. I’ve been using a knit glove filled with a ping pong ball for some students to help them lift the inside knuckles and keep them from falling in while trying to get their fingers to stay on the bow.

I have students who have double jointed fingers and thumbs who could benefit greatly from such a glove.

For the life of me, I do not know why such a useful device could disappear from the web. I would be so greatful if any of you could relocate it for me.

Tankyou in advance for your detective work.

Ms. Cynthia
Studio:
Talent Education Center: Suzuki Violin
Director of Santa Ana Suzuki Strings located at the
Orange County Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center
Volunteer, bring music to under-served communities around the world. Create Sound Investments and Futures.

Ruth Brons said: Mar 7, 2010
Ruth Brons
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Livingston, NJ
148 posts

I can recommend the Bow Hold Buddies[tm] bow accessory to help position and shape fingers.
Check it out at http://www.things4strings.com

Ruth Brons
Inventor of Bow Hold Buddies[tm] and
CelloPhant[tm] Instant Bow Hold bow accessories
http://www.things4strings.com

Cynthia Faisst said: Mar 9, 2010
Cynthia Faisst
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education
Irvine, CA
127 posts

The one I’m looking for would work so much better for the students with soft double jointed thumbs.
Much to my frustration all I can find is the device you mentioned. As soon as it appeared I couldn’t find the glove device anywhere. I’m just pinching myself for not ordering one as soon as I saw it because it is much harder to create than the other device.

The bow buddy is not what my friend, a physical therapist would recommend at all because it simply makes your knuckles lock up and become ridged with out building up the muscles on the underside that lift your knuckles and give them flexibility. It doesn’t solve the problem of developing grasping reflex in the finger tips as you would need for holding a pencil, threading a bead or picking up a grain of rice with your finger tips. I want my students to be able to balance the bow with their finger tips with out grabbing it tightly.

None of my students have any problem putting their fingers in the right places. If they did all I have to do is use a piece of custom trimmed Dr. Scholls foam. The mole skin gives them skid proofing for their moist slippery fingers if they need it.

But most of them have problems keeping their joints from falling in and locking up.

I’m thinking of buying some memory foam to see if I can custom carve one for each student and hold it on the bow with rubber bands or something from the office supply store. In the meantime we’ve been using ping pong balls or super balls depending on the size of their hands. But would really like to create something that is softer.

Ms. Cynthia
Studio:
Talent Education Center: Suzuki Violin
Director of Santa Ana Suzuki Strings located at the
Orange County Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center
Volunteer, bring music to under-served communities around the world. Create Sound Investments and Futures.

Ruth Brons said: Mar 9, 2010
Ruth Brons
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Livingston, NJ
148 posts

Actually, the Bow Hold Buddies[tm] accessory does the OPPOSITE of making the fingers rigid.
The gentle support and security it provides the thumb, index and pinky fingers tend to relax the whole hand remarkably, while not constricting finger flexibility— which is why my students encouraged me to pursue manufacturing the accessory. When the hand is relaxed the fingers will remain curved without the need to build up the muscles.

Actually, on the topic of building hand muscles, I am remembering a session from the last SAA Conference devoted to the physical aspects of being an instrumentalist. It turned out to be a very interesting session. Among other things, the clinician pointed out that the muscles in the fingers are mostly tendons, which don’t really have muscle bellies to strengthen. I would love to learn more about that.

Thanks,

Ruth Brons
Inventor of Bow Hold Buddies[tm] and
CelloPhant[tm] Instant Bow Hold bow accessories
http://www.things4strings.com
[javascript protected email address]

Jennifer Visick said: Mar 9, 2010
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

So far as I understand it (and that is not very far, nor is it guaranteed to be a right understanding), tendons are those rather inelastic bands which connect the bones to the muscles. The tendons in your hand run from the many various bones of your hand through the carpal tunnel (which is, if I remember rightly, the tunnel or space inside of your wrist, surrounded by all the wrist bones), and from there attach themselves to some of the muscles in your arm…. so that it is muscles located in your arm that provide the force behind finger motion…. I think??

We should get the SAA to sponsor a course in basic anatomy, kinesiology, and biomechanics, with an emphasis on the inner workings of the hand, arms, & shoulders… or something!

Ruth Brons said: Mar 13, 2010
Ruth Brons
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Livingston, NJ
148 posts

Here is a description of a session to be presented at the upcoming SAA Conference…..very interesting stuff on the importance of understanding how your body is put together and meant to function. This session is labelled as of interest to cellists, but I would recommend it to any instrumentalist attending the conference. I believe it may be the same clinician was one of panel at the session I enjoyed two years ago:

Body Mapping for Developing Healthy Cellists

Constance Barrett

Body Mapping is described as “the application of anatomy and kinesiology to musical performance.” While Constance is addressing issues faced in teaching and playing the cello, Body Mapping has far-reaching applications to anything we do as people physically moving in the world. The body map, proven to exist by neuro-scientists, can have errors in it that will prevent people from moving appropriately. Constance will address specific common body-mapping errors in cello performance and teaching.

Ruth Brons
Things 4 Strings[tm] bow accessories
http://www.things4strings.com

You must log in to post comments.

A note about the discussion forum: Public discussion forum posts are viewable by anyone. Anyone can read the forums, but you must create an account with your email address to post. Private forums are viewable by anyone that is a part of that private forum's group. Discussion forum posts are the opinion of the poster and do not constitute endorsement by or official position of the Suzuki Association of the Americas, Inc.

Please do not use the discussion forums to advertise products or services