no group with only one

Sara said: Aug 27, 2009
 Violin
191 posts

I have a new student starting with me this month. She is almost three years old and right now she is the only one her age that I have. What do I do about the group situation. She clearly wont be able to participate with the older kids (currently my oldest student is 7).
Any ideas? I have tried contacting other teachers to see if she can join their groups but that has been a negative.
Thanks for any input!

“What is man’s ultimate direction in life? It is to look for love, truth, virtue, and beauty.” Dr. Shinichi Suzuki

Connie Sunday said: Aug 27, 2009
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

Once you have her playing Pepperoni Pizza on the E string, I don’t see why she can’t come to group lessons, and play Twinkle with the other students. And she can play (with toys) and listen, during the rest of the lesson.

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Jennifer Visick said: Aug 27, 2009
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

Enlist her parents as teacher’s aids—alert them beforehand that one of them should participate in the class as if they were a student, and they can help the 3 year old to play or “air bow” the rhythms when appropriate, and sit down to listen or hum along with the other songs. You can help build endurance by choosing a “key” song and introducing “can you keep a good playing position posture during this (recorded version of this) song?” during an individual lesson and then challenge the 3-year old to listen for the same song during group class and see if they can do it with “live” musicians as well as with the recording.

You could have a key song for “how many good bow holds can you make for your mom/dad during this song”?
and another key song for air bowing up and down with the other students

you can play listening games with the entire class—”raise your hand when you hear a wrong note”—or “everyone stand over here for Part A, and when we get to part B, move to the other side of the line” or “I’m going to play a song for you. Stand up when I play forte, and crouch down when I play piano” or some such thing.

Laura said: Aug 28, 2009
 
Suzuki Association Member
Piano
358 posts

What about the opposite situation—i.e. an older student beginner who is not as far along as the other, younger, students in the class? They eventually get bored/resentful of being “teacher’s inspector”—what else can they do?

Connie Sunday said: Aug 28, 2009
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

purple_tulips

What about the opposite situation—i.e. an older student beginner who is not as far along as the other, younger, students in the class? They eventually get bored/resentful of being “teacher’s inspector”—what else can they do?

One thing you can do is devise a solo or duet with you and them, or both of you and a pianist. Just find some music for them to work on. The other children will learn when they listen to it, and it’s only fair.

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Sara said: Aug 28, 2009
 Violin
191 posts

Thanks for your ideas! I think I can work with it now. It really helps to have this forum and all of your wonderful input!! I guess I will just have her come anyway and we’ll do what we can to involve her.

“What is man’s ultimate direction in life? It is to look for love, truth, virtue, and beauty.” Dr. Shinichi Suzuki

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