Dealing with anti-Suzuki remarks

Connie Sunday said: Oct 3, 2008
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

I was going to stay out of this but I think I will interject something. I’m very proud of the way everyone on this board has reacted to the negative comments regarding Suzuki method/philosophy by our newest member.

I myself, in the past, have felt somewhat like David feels, and in my limited experience at that time, mirrored the complaints of many traditional teachers regarding the negative elements in the training of some Suzuki students. David’s comments are quite normal, and quite common.

When I expressed these reservations in some online forums (not here), I was attacked personally, denigrated over many months and in some cases, kicked off of the forum permanently.

This always seemed odd to me since, by all reports, Dr. Suzuki was one of the kindest persons imaginable—and to be made to endure ad hominem attacks over philosophical or pedagogical differences of opinion, always struck me as profoundly contrary to the spirit of the founder.

In my memory, those ad hominem attacks have never occurred on this board, and I’m proud that David’s perhaps less-than-diplomatic remarks have been met with such kindness and patience.

Thank you

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Laura said: Oct 3, 2008
 
Suzuki Association Member
Piano
358 posts

Connie, I’m sure many of us would love hear your “transformation testimony” if you’d care to share it? What eventually turned you around?

Connie Sunday said: Oct 3, 2008
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

purple_tulips

Connie, I’m sure many of us would love hear your “transformation testimony” if you’d care to share it? What eventually turned you around?

There’s really no “transformation testimony.” I am by nature a skeptic and a free thinker, in the Bertrand Russell tradition. I’m not a “true believer” —in anything. In other words, I agree with Russell that you should only believe those things for which there is some evidence, that for your thought to be free, you should hold things to be “true” in a tentative fashion, and be willing to revise your views if more convincing evidence is offered.

In other words, the search for truth is sacred—even if, and perhaps especially if, it contradicts your most cherished beliefs.

See:
Elitism versus Popularism in Music Education

The Suppression of Genius and Sensibility in the Public School System

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

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