Looking for April Fools recitals ideas

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Pietra Brady said: Mar 11, 2011
 Violin
5 posts

My community’s monthly recitals fall on April Fools day this year. The kids are encouraged to have some fun with this—not pranks, necessarily, but they can play something in a new, silly, or imaginative way. Any ideas? There are students of all levels in this group. Thanks!

said: Mar 13, 2011
 63 posts

If you have any advanced violin students, I’d highly recommend seeing if they can play the first part of the Scherzo of Beethoven’s “Spring” sonata. Or at least listen to it, or see a video! The way it’s written it seems as though the violinist is always coming in late. Or another scherzo (or just discussing the meaning of scherzo), or finding other musical jokes (Humoresque…?)

Barb said: Mar 23, 2011
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Maybe someone can play something backwards or upside down? Or try to start a piece holding the violin and bow with the wrong hands before “realizing” their mistake. :)

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Pietra Brady said: Apr 27, 2011
 Violin
5 posts

Thought I’d share some of the cute ideas that kids/parents had for the April Fools Day recital, in case anyone else ever wants ideas:

A little 6-year old announced, “I am going to play Twinkle, backwards.” She took a bow, got all set up, then turned around on her footchart and played the song with her back to the audience. The audienced howled at that one.

A father played Pop Goes the Weasel on his violin, and his son, a pre-Twinkler, plucked the F# for POP on his violin.

A pair of twins dressed identically and played Mozart’s Der Schpiegel (The Mirror Duet, also sometimes called the Tabletop Duet). The music is written so that one player reads the music ride-side up and the other player reads the music upside-down. Very cool!

A sibling pair played Dueling Fiddles (same as Dueling Banjos)—the older sibling started and the younger copied. The older sibling played just a little more challenging phrases each time, and the younger was able to keep up right up until the older one played the first few splashy measures of the Accolay violin concerto. The younger sibling looked up at his brother and said, “HEY NO FAIR!” Adorable.

A father and son played a duet together—the father played a 1/16 scale violin, and the 8-year old boy played a full size violin. Especially cute because the dad, a big fella, literally pulled the 1/16th violin out of his jeans pocket!

An advanced student, who wasn’t listed in the program (wink), made a big show of putting a very long piece with several pages across two stands. He announced he was going to play, “So-and-so’s (invented composer’s name) Mousetrap Sonata.” He took his bow, then set his bow behind the bridge, played very softly at the tip in a brief tremolo, followed by a loud snapping of the G string against the fingerboard (the mousetrap). Then he took a bow.

Two Twinklers who are best friends played the Bread part of Twinkle with rhythm variation A, taking turns one note at a time. While one girl played a note, the other girl would do “soft knees” dip (like a plie in ballet), then they’d switch.

Really creative stuff!

Barb said: Apr 29, 2011
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Thanks for sharing. Sounds like it was a fun time!

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

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