Question about Book 4 Violin CD’s

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said: Feb 3, 2008
 103 posts

Hello everyone!
I’m hoping you can help solve a mystery for me. I just bought two different copies of the violin Bk 4 CD, one by David Nadien and the other by David Cerone.

While I’m expecting differences in the musical interpretations or style, I wasn’t expecting to look at the track list and see different pieces! Do any of you know why this is? For those that haven’t seen them, the Cerone’s one has a different piece:
—Concerto in A Minor, 2nd Movement, A. Vivaldi

It also does not have the Concerto for Two Violins, 1st Movement by Bach on this CD. Why is this?

However one thing that’s nice (haven’t listened to it yet though), is that the two Lullaby’s (by Schubert & Brahms) are recorded on the Cerone CD (they’re not on the Nadien one).

Anyway, what do you have your students listen to? The Nadien one? Are there specific Suzuki ones that you’d recommend? Or are there other recordings out there that you use at this point rather than the official ones? Suggestions, opinions etc. would all be most helpful, thanks!*

Lynn said: Feb 4, 2008
 
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
173 posts

The second movement to the Vivaldi A minor is in Book 5, and the missing Bach Double concerto is on the Book 5 CD.

said: Feb 4, 2008
 Violin, Guitar, Flute, Cello, Viola
120 posts

I actually asked this same question a while back. I now have my students purchase both the Cerone AND the Nadien Book 4 CD’s. This way they get everything. I was noticing that the Bach Double 2nd violin part in Book 4 was giving students a very hard time as learned it, despite the fact that I had made each of them a tape of myself playing it very slowly. Only then did I discover that they had not even been listening to it, since they had the Cerone CD. The tape I made was not enough in itself—and it seemed to make a diference that they hadn’t been listening to it since beginning Book 4.

Now that they have both CD’s I think it’s great that they can hear everything—the slow movement of the A minor, the lullabyes, and the Bach Double. I hope at some point the SAA would make another CD that has everything on it.

Nobuaki said: Feb 4, 2008
Nobuaki Tanaka
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Mount Prospect, IL
115 posts

When students start working book four pieces, I also ask them to listen Itzhak Perlman’s “concerto from my childhood.” He recorded Seitz concerton in the CD. So students may have chance to recognize different phrasing and articulations.

Jennifer Visick said: Feb 6, 2008
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
997 posts

I think book 4 (or even before book 4) is a good time to start them listening to whatever vivaldi or bach or seitz recordings of professional groups or performers they can get their hands on. My local libraries have lots of good cds. I also suggest iTunes and our local classical radio stations as good places to ‘hunt’ for the composers in their suzuki repertoire.

The STYLE of the era and the composer can be caught by this time even when a person is not listening to the actual piece they are learning.

Heidi said: Feb 6, 2008
 Violin
33 posts

Does anyone have any suggestions for supplemental recordings of Book 4 repetoire? I have found recordings of the Bach double (Hilary Hahn, Perlman/Zukerman, Rachel Podger, MANY others..). I’d be interested in hearing about Vivaldi A minor—what supplemental recordings are available?

said: Feb 6, 2008
 Violin, Guitar, Flute, Cello, Viola
120 posts

upbeat

Does anyone have any suggestions for supplemental recordings of Book 4 repetoire? I have found recordings of the Bach double (Hilary Hahn, Perlman/Zukerman, Rachel Podger, MANY others..). I’d be interested in hearing about Vivaldi A minor—what supplemental recordings are available?

I was just going to post about this! I recently asked several students to find non-Suzuki recordings of the Vivaldi A minor. One of them said he found a recording by Nigel Kennedy. I listened to it, and while I think he is fascinating, it is from from “standard”, and not exactly something I want them to emulate. Besides, at their age and level I am trying to get them to find interpretations that are within their reach. Nigel Kennedy is within their reach if they’re trying to be silly. :)

I started searching myself, and I found a recording of the Vivaldi by Yehudi Menuhin (A minor). I also found a recording of the Vivaldi G minor Concerto from book 5 by Mischa Elman. So, I am now recommending those to my students.

It was only after hearing the Nigel Kennedy version that I remembered that the Vivaldi A minor we know is arranged by Natchez. I searched a little and could not find anything about him. Does anyone know anything about him, and also, is there an “original” version of the A minor concerto that is not arranged?

said: Feb 6, 2008
 89 posts

Sarah Chang’s new Vivaldi Four Seasons CD also has the g minor concerto included.

Lynn said: Feb 6, 2008
 
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
173 posts

The Vivaldi A minor concerto is from L’estro armonico, a collection of 12 concertos opus 3, published in 1711 in Amsterdam. The A minor concerto is opus 3 no. 6, RV 356.

Itzhak Perlman has recorded both the G minor concerto (Op. 12 no. 1, RV 317) and the aforementioned A minor concerto on a CD titled Vivaldi: Four Violin Concertos with EMI Classics.

Sir Neville Marriner and the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields recorded a CD called Vivaldi:L’estro armonico on the London label.

In keeping with RainJen’s excellent suggestion, Italian violinist Giuliano Carmignola and the Venice Baroque Orchestra has made several recordings of some of the lesser known Vivaldi violin concerti, as well as the 4 Seasons. The playing is brilliant, energetic and exciting to listen to.

Don’t you think that if kids are going to study a concerto, they should also “get” the most basic feature of a concerto, which is the dialogue/contrast/interplay between the solo instrument and orchestra?! And I mean get it, not just be told! Completely impossible with the Suzuki recordings.

Heidi said: Feb 6, 2008
 Violin
33 posts

Hey, thanks for the info on Vivaldi A minor! I found lots of recordings, thanks to your RV/Opus number information. Much appreciated. :D

Jennifer Visick said: Feb 7, 2008
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
997 posts

traim

I also found a recording of the Vivaldi G minor Concerto from book 5 by Mischa Elman.

And while you’re recommending Elman recordings, it would be good to put in a word about the history of the Suzuki movement: namely, that Dr. Suzuki’s first experience with the true possibilities of the sound of the violin was at age 17 when he heard a Mischa Elman recording on his new grammophone. He rushed to his father’s violin factory, picked up an instrument, brought it home, and listened and practiced and bought another recording and listened and practiced and listened and practiced again…. it’s a great story. You might say that Elman was the spark which lit the fire of making music in Dr. Suzuki’s soul….

said: Feb 7, 2008
 Violin, Guitar, Flute, Cello, Viola
120 posts

Absolutely! :)

Coutier said: Feb 11, 2008
Coutier RademakerViolin
58 posts

I am in the possession of test cd’s 4A and 4B of the Step by Step series. They include all the book 4 pieces (except for the Brahms Lullaby) and some outstanding “out-of-book” pieces.

The Seitzes and Vivaldi a minor are all in three tempi: slow and medium with violin and piano, performance tempo with piano only.

There is a number of very good preparatory exercises; one of them, concerning bars 51-52 of the Bach double, a gentle naughtiness of genius pianist David Andruss, which I am sure would make old J.S. giggle.

Out-of-book pieces include two lullaby’s and two fiddle pieces, so powerful I prefer to play them standing on the table. You want a crazy groupsession? Play them, the kids won’t stop!

Even though these cd’s are “mere” test cd’s and some work will still be done on them, they are already of exceptional quality (recorded in Steinway Haus Studio’s Düsseldorf). Rudolf Gähler, Kerstin Wartberg herself and Kathrin Averdung are the violinists.

As part of a test program I was asked to listen to the cd’s and work with them and give feedback. I understand that any Suzuki teacher who is interested in taking part in the testing-phase will receive the cd’s (either free of charge or for postage fee). Just write to the german Suzuki website: http://www.germansuzuki.de

Enjoy!

coutier

said: Feb 11, 2008
 103 posts

Thanks everyone for clarifying this issue for me! Also thanks for the suggestions on listening—I hope to look into the various suggestions soon and will save them for future reference.

Of course if any of the rest of you still have suggestions on good recordings, they are welcome too, the more the merrier!

said: Oct 27, 2008
 4 posts

Concerning violin book 4 recordings I found some other very good stuff. In the new Suzuki Downloadshop you can download all pieces as MP3 file (with soloist or only piano accompaniment in two or three different tempos with many good preparatory exercises).

Even the Bohm “Perpetual Motion” is already included, which will be added in the new revised book 4. In the Downloadshop it is recorded in several tempos which are realistic to achieve for book 4 students. In Barbara Barber’s book this piece is just too quick. Perhaps later in book 6 and up the tempo of Barbara Barber is ok.

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