Orientation for middle-school violin parents

Elise Winters said: Aug 22, 2014
Elise Winters
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Austin, TX
37 posts

I just created this “skills summary” to give parents along with a lesson registration form. Articulating my teaching outline helped solidify my own thinking … and hopefully will make my curriculum more “real” for parents with whom I have very little in-person contact.

Lessons during the school day are “invisible” to parents; I really sympathize with how hard it is to know if one’s child is getting value. My hope is that seeing the skills listed will help them feel good about their investment! My hope is also to give parents tools that will enable them to be more involved in their child’s violin study .

I hope some of you will find this useful. I appreciate any feedback & additional ideas!!

Orientation to Private Lessons

Elise Winters said: Aug 23, 2014
Elise Winters
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Austin, TX
37 posts

Okay, here’s the next morsel for this week’s pedagogical box of chocolates: “Being Successful in Violin Lessons.” I just finished this; my goal is to include this in the same take-home packet for prospective middle school students.

Even if they sign up with a different teacher, hopefully this is something they will remember and use … and may lead to a future referral. Enjoy!!

MS How to Be Successful in Violin Lessons

Christine said: Aug 23, 2014
Christine Goodner
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Suzuki Early Childhood Education, Viola
Hillsboro, OR
68 posts

Thanks for sharing—these are great!

Christine Goodner

Studio Website: Brookside Suzuki Strings

Blog: The Suzuki Triangle

“When Love is Deep, Much can be Accomplished” ~ Suzuki

Erin said: Aug 27, 2014
Erin Ellis
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Brooklyn, NY
4 posts

Thanks so much for sharing. These are great!

Barbara Stafford said: Aug 28, 2014
Barbara Stafford
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
Plano, TX
59 posts

That is a very thorough summary! The summary makes obvious the depth of the contribution you are able to make with your teaching, gives parents and students a great sense of the short and longer-term development that is possible, and helps students and parents avoid the pitfall of failing to practice, which prevents that optimal progress. I am thinking I probably teach lessons in a similar setting . ( I am hosted by the public schools during orchestra class.) My main strategy has been in the lessons themselves, simply by giving students my best attention, sensitivity, as well as having a plan forward for each student. When the students recognize I am nurturing them, I am a safe person to learn from, and I am truly interested in their progress, then they usually appreciate it, and they transmit that interest to continue lessons to their parents. But, I wish I was better at attracting students and promoting lessons myself so I could have more lessons that involve the “Suzuki triangle”. Thank you for sharing this professional foot forward approach that you developed for the middle school setting!

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