Ideas for advertising private lessons

Marjie Shemanski said: Jun 4, 2012
Marjie ShemanskiViolin, Piano, Viola
Philadelphia, PA
1 posts

My husband and I just moved to Ann Arbor MI and I am looking for creative ways to get the word out lessons. Previously I had my own private studio built from zero to over 40 students, and the best method of advertisement was word of mouth and patience. However, after seeing all the awesome ideas on this discussion board, I am wondering if there are any other creative ideas that might help speed up the process of building my studio again.
Thanks!
-Marjie

Terry French said: Jun 4, 2012
Terry French
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
Chester, VA
1 posts

Marjie,
In our area, the school system celebrates “Music in our Schools Month” in March. As part of the celebration, several schools have “Very Important Musician Week,” in that they invite friends and relatives of students to come share their instrument(s) with the class. I started out coming to my daughter’s class to play for them, and as my studio grew, I also came to my students’ classes. Each year, I receive many calls after my visit because so many children get excited about the violin after hearing and seeing me play. If your area doesn’t present that opportunity, I suggest that you call the music teachers and volunteer to play for their classes to give the children the opportunity to see and hear the violin and viola in person. Schools have a hard time turning away people who are willing to volunteer their time and talent.
Hope this helps,
Terry

Barb said: Jun 4, 2012
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Hi Marjie,

Here are some former discussions which may give you some ideas. The first one is about websites. A lot of people Google these days—have good key words on your home page, and put your website on all other cards, posters, ads, etc. Music Teacher’s Helper offers a free website (paid subscription for additional services)—link in my signature.
https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/13882/#c13086

This one https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/6317/#c9124
includes a list of things I did to advertise when I began teaching.

I would also suggest doing something to meet other teachers. You might get referrals from those with full studios.

I have more openings now, and one way I’m “recruiting” is by running a week-long introductory class at our community center. While they keep a registration fee for each participant, it’s a very inexpensive way of advertising for me, and they provide the location. Their booklets are distributed to most homes in our town with my name as the instructor, and I’m also doing some advertising on my own through email and posters. Here https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/14536/ is a description of my program, and here https://suzukiassociation.org/discuss/6361/#c9238 is a discussion about an introductory violin program from Ruth Brons which sounds like a great idea, too.

Hope these give you some helpful ideas!

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Laura said: Jul 1, 2012
Laura Mozena
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
Palm City, FL
105 posts

I own YourMusicSupply.com a website specializing in Suzuki. We like to link Teachers and Schools websites and this could hep you get the word out to Suzuki Teachers and Students. Email me at [javascript protected email address] if you are interested. We would greatly appreciate a link on your website as well. You studnets can come to YourMusicSupply.com for all their SUZUKI needs.

Nice to meet you!

Laura

Merry Bing Pruitt said: Jul 1, 2012
 
Suzuki Association Member
Piano, Viola, Violin
2 posts

Here are some teacher-tested ideas to help get the word out: (1) tell your piano tuner/technician that you are looking to fill spots in your studio schedule. (2) many music stores (sheet music stores as well as instrument sales stores) have lists and/or bulletin boards to help their customers find teachers. (3) put up signs, business cards and/or flyers in local college prep divisions, schools, libraries, places of worship, etc. (4) get to know the music teachers in local elementary, middle and high schools. (5) have your students perform as volunteers according to their age and ability in local venues such as school arts fairs, coffee shops, hospitals, parades, etc. Just be sure an check out the venue and their equipment before committing to a performance. Some places aren’t too sure whether they have a piano or not, and that is important for you to know. Also, not all “grand pianos” are acoustic, some require an external speaker and some adjustment before they can be heard.

Elizabeth Friedman said: Jul 2, 2012
Elizabeth Friedman
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
49 posts

Internet, internet, internet! When I relocated to the UK last year, I used MusicTeachers.co.uk to get the word out. A large number of my students came from this web site, as it’s the first thing to pop up when parents search for a music teacher. They might not know to look on the SAA web site, or they might not even know to look for Suzuki (well, that’s the case here—Suzuki is much, much more of a standard in the US). MusicTeachers.co.uk is run by the Musicians’ Union here, and I paid the equivalent of $30 to have a ‘premium membership’ for a year, which kept my name in a rotation toward the top of the search list.

Google isn’t letting me search for an equivalent site in the USA because it knows I’m in the UK, but I’m sure there must be an equivalent.

I also connected with the (only) other Suzuki teacher in my town, who has a waiting list. She passed names on to me, and we have also combined studios for group classes and concerts. This has been a really great partnership.

I also got a few students by giving some cards to the local violin shop that services and provides student violins. The shop has a reputation for good quality, and so their word of mouth has meant a lot to students. Of course, in Ann Arbor, you have Shar (Sigh! Man, do I ever miss Shar!!!)—and I can’t remember whether they do teacher recommendations. I’m sure they probably do. But you might also see if Kerrytown Concert House would put out some cards.

Good luck!

Irene said: Jul 2, 2012
Irene YeongViolin
160 posts

I found our teacher from Google advertisement. She has wonderful website where I can see her other students performing and her teaching method.

Laura said: Jul 3, 2012
Laura Appert SpringhamViolin, Viola
33 posts

Contact my sister, Rebecca Kaltz. She is well connected in Ann Arbor and you can get in touch with her at www.rebeccaappert.com
She can introduce you to other Suzuki teachers in the area.
Laura

Shannon Jansma said: Jul 3, 2012
Shannon Jansma
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Ann Arbor, MI
2 posts

There is a Suzuki Association in Ann Arbor, my mom is the coordinator (her name is Marylou Roberts). Not sure what kind of vetting process they use (if any), but I know they get TONS of calls for violin kids, and there’s only one other Suzuki viola teacher I think.
Good luck!

Shannon Jansma said: Jul 3, 2012
Shannon Jansma
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Ann Arbor, MI
2 posts

Ha, forgot the most important part-just type in Marylou Roberts in the search bar here and her contact info will come up!

Laura said: Jul 4, 2012
Laura Appert SpringhamViolin, Viola
33 posts

My sister is part of the Ann Arbor Suzuki Association, the newest member, as far as I know. Good luck!

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