Ideas/questions?

Jodi LaChance said: May 10, 2012
 Violin, Suzuki in the Schools
4 posts

I’ll be speaking at the convention in MPLS and wondering if anyone has questions about working with challenging behaviors or students with learning disabilities.

I’m speaking on learning disabilities, ADHD, Oppositional Defiance, and strategies to work with students.
Let me know if there’s any topic or particular concern you would like to have addressed.

Thank you and hope to see you all there!
Jodi

Jodi LaChance, Ed.S., NCSP

Connie Sunday said: May 13, 2012
Connie SundayViolin, Piano, Viola
667 posts

I sure wish I could be there! I’ve had several students with Oppositional Defiance, and a couple with autism whom I had to let go because they were violent (either at school and/or at the lesson). I could use a lot more training in this area. Will your paper(s) be available online?

Connie

Free Handouts for Music Teachers & Students:
http://beststudentviolins.com/library.html#handouts

Jodi LaChance said: May 14, 2012
 Violin, Suzuki in the Schools
4 posts

Hi Connie!
I’m sorry I won’t be able to meet you at the conference. I have a list of resources that will be available online so watch for that.

Best wishes,
Jodi

Jodi LaChance, Ed.S., NCSP

Barb said: May 14, 2012
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

Hi Jodi,

I am also in the “wish I could be there” category. If I were there it might be interesting to hear some strategies for working with PARENTS with ADHD, etc. I find I have more patience with the students.

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Krista said: May 15, 2012
 Violin
1 posts

As a parent I would really be interested in strategies in practicing with a child who is often oppositional/defiant. (She concurs with me that arguing is her favorite sport).
It is really hard to keep the practice session positive without feeling like she is feeling the power to “play me.”

Jodi LaChance said: May 15, 2012
 Violin, Suzuki in the Schools
4 posts

THank you for ideas!

Barb,
Yes, working with parents or helping them understand the lesson protocol is challenging at times, especially when they have a disability.

Krista, I’ll be sharing strategies for working with children who engage in defiant behaviors.

After the presentation, I can post an outline of strategies/ideas for people not able to attend.

This gives me direction as far as what questions people have—thank you!

Jodi LaChance, Ed.S., NCSP

Carrie said: May 16, 2012
 
Suzuki Association Member
58 posts

Krista,
One thing I learned with my son in every day life (he was not a Suzuki student), was not to allow him to engage me in conflict. Example:
Samuel, take out the garbage.
It’s not my turn.
Samuel, take out the garbage.
Why can Brad do it? He’s just sitting at the computer.
Samuel, take out the garbage.
Why do I have to do everything around here?
Samuel, take out the garbage.
I’ll do it later.
Samuel, take out the garbage.
He finally took out the garbage. Each time I told him to take out the garbage, I said it without emotions, so I was not engaging emotionally either. I also was not distracted by anything else. I was looking at him, hearing what he had to say, but was not deterred from what I was telling him to do. Interestingly, it only took a couple of times like this before he started doing what I told him to do without arguing.
I keep having to correct myself. All my other children, I was able to “ask” to do something. I had to “tell” Samuel to do it or he thought it was optional.
Anyway, that’s what worked for my son. I hope it is helpful.
Carrie

carebear1158

Barb said: May 16, 2012
Barb Ennis
Suzuki Association Member
Cello
678 posts

On the asking/telling thing… I have a student whom I suspect has some degree of Asperger’s. When I asked him, “Will you practice that this week?” as a request, he thought I was asking him to tell the future and after a moment to think, answered with, “I don’t know.” Yes, some kids you have to tell! :-)

Barb
Music Teachers Helper—for individual teachers
Studio Helper—for entire music studios or schools

Terri Parsons said: May 16, 2012
Terri ParsonsCello, Flute
14 posts

Krista, I really do like the consistency of your approach. I find a lot of success with timing a student’s practicing. My parents tell me that they no longer have to time their child because of course along with practicing comes getting better at the instrument (including vocals) and with getting better comes more enjoyment which then becomes more like fun than like a chore which then circles back to more frequent and longer practice sessions driven by the student and not by the parents. I have parents tell me that their student now has to be drug from the practice room as they don’t want to give it up. This was my prediction and works every time a parent is diligent about timing their student’s practice sessions. What I suggest is that the parent “time” using a timer their student letting them know that once the music is out, instrument is in position, and they are ready to go with the agenda they set out for themselves for that session the timer will start. When 20 minutes is up the parent will come in and inform the student they may stop. The parent MUST be accurate because even though I suggest removing all time-telling devices from the practice area the student finds a way to test whether the parent is accurate and honest about stopping when the time is up. Once this trust is built, the student will not longer pay attention to the amount of time they have to practice. About 2-3 months of this on a very regular basis (6 days on and 1 mandatory day off) the parent finds they can increase the time to 30 minutes after informing the student that they will now have 10 more minutes on their timer because they are getting better, sounding better and therefore need to practice just a bit more to keep up with their terrific new skills. Once this goes on for a couple months the parent finds the student asking for 5—10 more minutes. The parent should say, “Ok, I will extend the timer and let you know when your 10 more minutes is up.” The student should be asked to continue to stop as this is another trust issue being tested. After the student is up to 40 minutes I doubt the parent will need to time the student any longer but the parent should remind the student to go into the practice room and if they would like to be reminded to stop the parent would be happy to do so. I have never had this fail. It establishes trust between both the parent and the student, it tells the student “there is an end to the practice time required of you”, and it gets them to practice consistently reaping the rewards of this teaching them a host of other principles.

Terri Parsons
Cello/Flute Teacher
Cellist
La T Da Music
www.lajollastrings.com

Irene Mitchell said: May 16, 2012
Irene Mitchell
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Dallas, TX
111 posts

WOW! What an inspiration, thanks for sharing :)

Sent from my iPhone

Irene Mitchell

Anita said: May 22, 2012
 38 posts

I recently hit on a neat parenting trick. My 7-year-old gets easily frustrated when he can’t play a piece “perfectly” the first time. Sometimes it’s the first time he’s played it and he still expects to be able to play it note-perfect the first time.
One day, he happened to have an empty water bottle on the table. As I saw the frustration and anger and tears begin to rise, I had him put his violin and bow down. I told him to pick up the bottle. Intrigued, he did as I asked. Then I asked him to unscrew the lid and blow all his “negative feelings” into the bottle—all his frustration, anger and upsetedness. He did. Then I told him to screw the cap back on.
I told him all his emotions would still be there—in the bottle—if he still wanted them after practice. Or he could unscrew the cap and let them go. They were his to do with as he pleased.
He grinned despite himself. He then focused on the rest of the lesson.
And at the end of practice, I purposefully ignored the bottle and what he did with it.
But after bedtime, as I was tidying up, I noticed the cap was off. He let them go!

AMB

Irene Mitchell said: May 22, 2012
Irene Mitchell
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Dallas, TX
111 posts

VERY cool; thanks, Anita! What a creative & compassionate solution. :o)

Irene Mitchell

Rachel said: Jul 19, 2012
 19 posts

Jodi,
How was the talk? Do you have an online summary you could share for those who were unable to attend?
Thanks!

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