Violin-Ear Training

Sandy Toms said: Dec 8, 2011
 9 posts

HI all,

I have a student who (I believe) has the ability to hear but is not catching her intonation problems. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Sandy

Paula Bird said: Dec 12, 2011
 
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Piano, Viola
Wimberley, TX
386 posts

I wrote a series of posts about intonation a while back. Just search “intonation.”

Paula E. Bird
TX State University
Wildflower Suzuki Studio
http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com (blog)
http://teachsuzuki.com (podcast)

Tiffany Holliday said: Dec 12, 2011
Tiffany Holliday
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Eugene, OR
12 posts

Have you heard if she can sing it “in tune?” Are you referring to harmonic or melodic intonation? Is it harder for her to play in tune with the piano rather than with another violin? Oh the rabbit hole of intonation truths…

Sent from my iPhone

Sandy Toms said: Dec 13, 2011
 9 posts

Thanks Tiffany. She is not consistently singing in tune but improving.
That’s part of her problem.

Sandy Toms

On Mon, Dec 12, 2011 at 4:10 PM, SAA Discussion
wrote:

Sandy Toms said: Dec 13, 2011
 9 posts

Thanks Paula.

Sandy Toms
On Mon, Dec 12, 2011 at 2:20 PM, SAA Discussion
wrote:

Sandy Toms said: Jan 12, 2012
 9 posts

Thanks Paula.

Sandy T.

On Mon, Dec 12, 2011 at 2:20 PM, SAA Discussion
wrote:

Julia said: Jan 12, 2012
Julia ProleikoViolin, Piano, Viola
Saint Louis, MO
22 posts

By far my kids’ favorite ear training game involves me playing a piece from book 1 cd and when I play a note out of tune, the student gets to ring a bell. They LOVE it when I “make a mistake”—there is something magical about the combination of ringing a bell and catching the teacher making a mistake. In this way, I can tell what is in their ear and what is just lacking in their fingers (and if they aren’t listening to their cd, another way to bring up listening: if parents SEE that you know when they aren’t listening, they usually make a better effort to listen).
Another great game for groups that I have seen a lot at workshops is pairing up students and playing slapjack. (Students sit across from each other, one person with their hands on top, the other with the hands below. If a note is wrong, the person on the bottom tries to slap the top of the hands of the person whose hands are on top and the person on top tries to pull their hands back so that they don’t get slapped.)
Hope that helps!

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