Words for Perpetual Motion

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said: Oct 24, 2011
 145 posts

I have a 7 year old pupil whos having great difficulty memorising perpetual motion and I thought some simple words would really help her. Does anyone have some that are easy to learn ?

Thank you

Paula Bird said: Oct 24, 2011
 
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Piano, Viola
Wimberley, TX
386 posts

I use Perp. Mot. to teach about patterns in music. I wonder why the student has trouble. Allenstein is going to be even more difficult. Is the student listening to the piece every day? Try assigning extra listening, like 3-5 times a day or fill in a 25 times chart, and see if this clears up the problem.

Paula E. Bird
TX State University
Wildflower Suzuki Studio
http://teachsuzuki.blogspot.com (blog)
http://teachsuzuki.com (podcast)

Elizabeth Rothenbusch said: Oct 24, 2011
 Violin, Piano, Viola
Cleveland, OH
6 posts

hi Nellyhere are some cute words to perpetual motion:

PERPETUAL MOTION

Have you seen an alligator,
Riding up an escalator?

Have you seen an alligator,
Riding down an elevator?

Once I saw a bear go riding,
In an airplane he was gliding.

Once I saw a bear go riding
Down a hiss his sled was riding.

Did you see that armadillo
Carried high upon a pillow?

Did you see that armadillo
Wave at us from on his pillow?

Have you seen an alligator,
Riding up an escalator?

Have you seen an alligator,
Riding down an elevator?

good luck!

Christiane said: Oct 25, 2011
Christiane Pors-Sadoff
Suzuki Association Member
Violin
New York, NY
47 posts

Hi! Cute words to P.M.
Is there a typo in the 4th stanza?
Is it supposed to be “hill” not “hiss”?
Thanks for the words…this will help a little
girl I am trying to “win over” this year!
Chris

Christiane Pors
Violinist
Mikomi Violin Studio
Kaufman Music Center
NYU Steinhardt

said: Oct 25, 2011
 145 posts

Thank you Elizabeth—I like these words very much. I’m sure my pupil will love them :)

Laurel said: Oct 25, 2011
Laurel MacCullochViolin
Langley, BC
120 posts

I use an action song, which I teach to kids at the pre-Twinkle level—so by the time they get to Perp. Motion (assuming parents have taken decent notes!) they’ve learned the tune pretty well. It’s from Susan Kempter’s Between Parent And Teacher:

Touch your toes toes
Touch your knees knees
Touch your waist and then go clap clap
Touch your toes toes
Touch your knees knees
Touch your waist and then go stomp stomp

Touch your eyes eyes
Touch your ears ears
Touch your nose and then go clap clap
Touch your eyes eyes
Touch your ears ears
Touch your nose and then you

Crouch down low and grow and grow and
Grow and grow until you reach the sky and
Crouch down low and grow and grow and
Grow and grow until you reach the sky and

Touch your toes toes
Touch your knees knees
Touch your waist and then go clap clap
Touch your toes toes
Touch your knees knees
Touch your waist and then go stomp stomp!

Laurel

Elizabeth Rothenbusch said: Oct 25, 2011
 Violin, Piano, Viola
Cleveland, OH
6 posts

yes there is a typo—sorry

Jennifer Visick said: Oct 27, 2011
Jennifer VisickForum Moderator
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Suzuki in the Schools, Violin
998 posts

OK… so I have to laugh at myself… I’m sitting here trying to sing these words and thinking “that can’t be right… how on earth does that fit the tune?”

…then I realize that I’m singing Etude, not Perpetual Motion… :-P

said: Oct 27, 2011
 145 posts

Ha ha that’s funny…… It’s easy to get those two mixed up!!!!

Wendy Caron Zohar said: Oct 28, 2011
Wendy Caron Zohar
Suzuki Association Member
Violin, Viola
Ann Arbor, MI
94 posts

New Comment on Words for Perpetual Motion from LaurelMFor me, text ideally should connect the melodic structure and song topography, i.e. be depictive of the song structure. It makes sense to me to fashion words that accomplish this. The words work for the opening and closing verse. But wouldn’t it make sense for the second verse, which starts on the high A, to say something about reaching up to the clouds or sky etc, and then touching somewhere a little bit lower each subsequent line? Then the 3rd verse, which starts on the c#, perhaps ought not be crouch down low, because that’s where verse 1 started, and that was for open A. I’d make the c# verse begin at least around the tummy and proceed back up, at least to the forehead… But that’s me, thinking actual pitch and how high they fall on the body, etc.

For that matter, when I have my students try to sing an A at the beginning of each lesson, I have them stand and physically feel the A, somewhere up on their forehead. They’re starting to get it! The E is above the head, the D is around the sternum, and the G is in the belly. Pitch height, as well as song contour, can be felt: It’s physical!

WZ

Wendy Caron Zohar

Sue Hunt said: Nov 4, 2011
Sue Hunt
Suzuki Association Member
Viola, Violin
390 posts

Of course the main thing is listening every day and learning the open A and open E endings. However, these words make kids laugh:

Practise, practise, practise, practise,
Every day we have to practise.
Practise, practise, practise, practise,
Every day we have to do it.

If it’s cloudy, if its rainy
We don’t ever get complainy;
Even when the sun is shining,
You will never hear us whining.

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and

Practise, practise, practise, practise,
Every day we have to practise.
Practise, practise, practise, practise,
Every day we have to do it.

Cheers Music in Practice

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